• Heat Exhauston (Stress) - Operations involving high air temperatures, radiant heat sources, high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects, or strenuous physical activities have a high potential for inducing heat stress in employees engaged in such operations. Such places include: iron and steel foundries, nonferrous foundries, brick-firing and ceramic plants, glass products facilities, rubber products factories, electrical utilities (particularly boiler rooms), bakeries, confectioneries, commercial kitchens, laundries, food canneries, chemical plants, mining sites, smelters, and steam tunnels.

  • Respiratory Safety - In the control of those occupational diseases caused by breathing air contaminated with harmful dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors, the primary objective shall be to prevent atmospheric contamination. This shall be accomplished as far as feasible by accepted engineering control measures (for example, enclosure or confinement of the operation, general and local ventilation, and substitution of less toxic materials). When effective engineering controls are not feasible, or while they are being instituted, appropriate respirators shall be used pursuant to this section.

  • Hand and power tools are a common part of our everyday lives and are present in nearly every industry. These tools help us to easily perform tasks that otherwise would be difficult or impossible. However, these simple tools can be hazardous and have the potential for causing severe injuries when used or maintained improperly. Special attention toward hand and power tool safety is necessary in order to reduce or eliminate these hazards.


  • 1910.1030 - Blood borne Pathogens: The OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030) requires employers to eliminate, or at least minimize, the hazards of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens. The standard requires employers of workers at risk of occupational exposure to blood or OPIM to develop a written Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan. In addition, such employers must implement a combination of safety measures including engineering and work practice controls, personal protective equipment, employee training, and offering potentially exposed workers the vaccination against hepatitis B.
  • NORM - Under various circumstances, the radionuclides, primarily from the uranium and thorium decay series, can contaminate the environment to the extent that they pose real or potential public health risks. The investigation and regulatory control of the impacts of most of these sources have been overlooked by federal and state agencies in the past, while stringent controls were placed on X-ray and other man-made sources of radiation. This lack of strict controls has been due, in part, to the fact that the federal government has limited jurisdiction over TENR, and control was previously left up to the states, which often times did not have adequate programs or staff to deal with the problem. TENR is a subset of a larger grouping referred to as naturally-occurring radioactive materials (NORM), Regulations to deal with NORM are being developed by a task force of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and have been through six drafts to date.
  • Planning and carrying out road transport missions safely requires a thorough understanding and strict adherence to safety rules established by an Organisation. The challenge is to coordinate and monitor each step in this process so that missions are managed competently from beginning to end.
  • Drug & Alcohol - The vast majority of drug users are employed, and when they arrive for work, they don't leave their problems at the door. Of the 17.2 million illicit drug users aged 18 or older in 2005, 12.9 million (74.8 percent) were employed either full or part time. Furthermore, research indicates that between 10 and 20 percent of the nation's workers who die on the job test positive for alcohol or other drugs. In fact, industries with the highest rates of drug use are the same as those at a high risk for occupational injuries, such as construction, mining, manufacturing and wholesale.

  • Fatigue: The signs are clearly seen on the face. The eyes look tired and sleepy, forehead is creased, the head is rests on the hands and there are files piled on the desk waiting to be looked at. If you find yourself in this way more often than not; you are suffering from fatigue at work. This feeling of chronic tiredness, frequent headaches, muscle weakness and moodiness are symptoms of fatigue.